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IP65 30W Compact RGB LED Floodlight Dimmable in Black with Remote Control 1200lm Integral LED ILFLRGB030

IP65 30W Compact RGB LED Floodlight Dimmable in Black with Remote Control 1200lm Integral LED ILFLRGB030

This is the Integral LED ILFLRGB030 30W compact colour RGB IP65 rated floodlight dimmable with remot..

Model: EHSRGB1

£21.00 Ex. VAT

Megaman Tott 9.5W LED Floodlight in Black 4000K 900lm, IP65 Slim Surface Mounted LED Flood

Megaman Tott 9.5W LED Floodlight in Black 4000K 900lm, IP65 Slim Surface Mounted LED Flood

This is the Megaman 180290 Tott black LED flood light 9.5W, a slim lightweight surface-mounted integ..

Model: EHSM95DB

£9.94 Ex. VAT

10W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 10W LED Flood

10W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 10W LED Flood

This is the ALL-LED AFL010/CCT, a 10W CCT LED flood light with a rating of IP65 (ideal for outdoor),..

Model: EHSCC10

£11.99 Ex. VAT

10W IP65 White Slim CCT LED Floodlight Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 10W LED Flood

10W IP65 White Slim CCT LED Floodlight Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 10W LED Flood

This is the ALL-LED AFL010/CCT/WH, a 10W CCT LED flood light in Polar White with a rating of IP65 (i..

Model: EHSCC10W

£11.99 Ex. VAT

20W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 20W LED Flood

20W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 20W LED Flood

This is the ALL-LED AFL020/CCT, a 20W CCT LED flood light with a rating of IP65 (ideal for outdoor),..

Model: EHSCC20

£18.50 Ex. VAT

20W IP65 White Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 20W LED Flood

20W IP65 White Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 20W LED Flood

This is the ALL-LED AFL020/CCT/WH, a 20W CCT LED flood light in Polar White with a rating of IP65 (i..

Model: EHSCC20W

£18.50 Ex. VAT

10W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adjustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL010/CCT/PIR Hunter LED Flood with PIR

10W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adjustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL010/CCT/PIR Hunter LED Flood with PIR

This is the ALL-LED AFL010/CCT/PIR, a 10W CCT LED flood light with PIR with a rating of IP65 (ideal ..

Model: ESSCC10

£19.75 Ex. VAT

30W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 30W LED Flood

30W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 30W LED Flood

This is the ALL-LED AFL030/CCT, a 30W CCT LED flood light with a rating of IP65 (ideal for outdoor),..

Model: EHSCC30

£26.50 Ex. VAT

10W IP65 White Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adjustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL010/CCT/PIR/W Hunter LED Flood with PIR

10W IP65 White Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adjustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL010/CCT/PIR/W Hunter LED Flood with PIR

This is the ALL-LED AFL010/CCT/PIR/W, a 10W CCT LED flood light with PIR with a rating of IP65 (idea..

Model: ESSCC10W

£19.75 Ex. VAT

20W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL020/CCT/PIR Hunter LED Flood with PIR

20W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL020/CCT/PIR Hunter LED Flood with PIR

This is the ALL-LED AFL020/CCT/PIR, a 20W CCT LED flood light with an adjustable PIR with a rating o..

Model: ESSCC20

£26.50 Ex. VAT

30W IP65 White Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 30W LED Flood

30W IP65 White Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 30W LED Flood

This is the ALL-LED AFL030/CCT/WH, a 30W CCT LED flood light with a rating of IP65 (ideal for outdoo..

Model: EHSCC30W

£26.50 Ex. VAT

20W IP65 White Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL020/CCT/PIR/WH Hunter LED Flood with PIR

20W IP65 White Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL020/CCT/PIR/WH Hunter LED Flood with PIR

This is the ALL-LED AFL020/CCT/PIR/WH, a 20W CCT LED flood light with an adjustable PIR with a ratin..

Model: ESSCC20W

£26.50 Ex. VAT

30W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adjustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL030/CCT/PIR Hunter LED Flood with PIR

30W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adjustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL030/CCT/PIR Hunter LED Flood with PIR

This is the ALL-LED AFL030/CCT/PIR, a 30W CCT LED flood light and Adjustable PIR with a rating of IP..

Model: ESSCC30

£32.50 Ex. VAT

50W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 50W LED Flood

50W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable 3000K, 4000K, 6000K, All-LED Hunter 50W LED Flood

This is the ALL-LED AFL050/CCT, a 50W CCT LED flood light with a rating of IP65 (ideal for outdoor),..

Model: EHSCC50

£31.20 Ex. VAT

30W IP65 White Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adjustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL030/CCT/PIR/WH Hunter LED Flood with PIR

30W IP65 White Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adjustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL030/CCT/PIR/WH Hunter LED Flood with PIR

This is the ALL-LED AFL030/CCT/PIR/W, a 30W CCT LED flood light and Adjustable PIR with a rating of ..

Model: ESSCC30W

£32.50 Ex. VAT

50W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adjustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL050/CCT/PIR Hunter LED Flood with PIR

50W IP65 Black Slim CCT LED Floodlight with Tri-Colour Selectable and Adjustable PIR, ALL-LED AFL050/CCT/PIR Hunter LED Flood with PIR

This is the ALL-LED AFL050/CCT/PIR, a 50W CCT LED flood light and Adjustable PIR with a rating of IP..

Model: ESSCC50

£39.75 Ex. VAT

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Related Articles

The Best Lighting for Your Garage [Ultimate Guide]

If you’re looking for some of the best lighting ideas for a garage, then you’re in the right place. A garage is an essential part of any home - not just for parking your car in. Many people turn their garages into their own workshops or a place to store extra items that won't fit in the house.However, you can't work in a sad and dim space. You need ample lighting to move around safely and conveniently. Good garage lighting can make a world of difference, especially if you use your garage as a workspace or for storage. Read on to learn more about garage lighting ideas.Why is lighting for garages important? Garages are usually darker than other parts of the house because they don't normally have large windows built in to allow natural light inside. Though often taken for granted, lighting for garages is extremely important for the following reasons:1. SafetyA poorly lit garage can be a safety hazard, as it increases the risk of accidents and injuries. This is particularly dangerous if you have heavy or sharp tools and equipment lying around. With proper lighting, you can easily see where you are going and avoid tripping over objects or tools. It is therefore essential for creating a safe and secure environment for you and everybody living in your home.2. SecurityGood lighting for a garage can help deter burglars and intruders, as they are less likely to attempt a break-in if the garage is well-lit.Installing motion sensor lights can also alert you to any suspicious activity on your property. For commercial garages, lighting is vital to keep your business safe. You don’t want unexpected people, pests, or animals wandering around in your garage at night.3. ProductivityIf you use your garage as a workspace, a well-lit space simply makes it easier to find and access your tools and equipment.This can save you a lot of time and frustration, and allow you to focus on your projects. Plus, having ample lighting sources prevents you from straining your eye.4. AestheticsGood indoor lighting can also enhance the look and feel of your garage, making it a more appealing and enjoyable space to work in. If you have a garage that serves as a commercial space, having adequate lighting will also make it more inviting to customers and guests.How bright should your indoor garage lighting be?A bare bulb or fluorescent strip is not an ideal lighting set-up for your garage. You should consider layering multiple lighting sources to achieve the effect you want. Artificial lighting uses three types of light - ambient, task, and accent. You will need all three to make your indoor garage lighting truly stand  out.Ambient lighting is a soft, overhead light used to help you find your way around safely. Task lighting is a brighter light source that illuminates work and storage areas for better visibility. Accent lighting falls somewhere in between the first two in terms of brightness. It is added to emphasize spaces or fixtures that you may want to highlight - like a trophy case or a cherished tool collection.What kind of garage lighting ideas should I considerYou can choose from a variety of indoor and outdoor garage lighting fixtures, including:1. LED lightsLED lights are energy-efficient and provide bright and even lighting for any garage. They use 50% of the wattage of a standard fluorescent tube and as much as 90% less than an incandescent light bulb.They also last about twice as long, so you won't have to replace them often. You can install LED lights in the form of overhead lights or strip lights along the walls or shelves.2. Motion sensor lightsMotion sensor lights turn on automatically when you enter the garage and turn off after you leave. This is a great energy-saving option if you often forget to turn off the lights. Also, motion sensor lights will deter trespassers from entering your home.3. Task lightingIf you use your garage as a workspace, task lighting is essential. You can install adjustable lamps or clamp-on lighting for garage that can be positioned exactly where you need them.4. Natural lightIf your garage has windows, consider using natural light as much as possible. This will not only save on your energy bills but also provide a pleasant and healthy environment. You can also install skylights if your garage does not have windows.5. Smart lightingSmart lighting allows you to control your garage lights from a remote, like this smart outdoor garage lighting fixture. You can turn on/off the lights, dim them, or change the colour temperature. This is a great option if you want to customise your lighting to suit different activities.6. FloodlightsFloodlights are powerful and broad-beamed lights that are used to illuminate large areas. They are designed to provide a high level of visibility and are great for use in outdoor settings.You can use them to increase visibility and security. If you use your outdoor space for sports, like mini golf or basketball, flood lights will serve as a great artificial light source for games that go on into the night.7. Under-cabinet lightingIf you have cabinets or shelves in your garage, under-cabinet lighting for garage can help illuminate the space below. This is a great option if you store small items that are difficult to see in the dark.8. Flush-mount ceiling lightA flush-mount ceiling light is installed directly on the ceiling. It is a simple, inexpensive garage lighting idea great for lower ceilings since they won't need to be suspended.9. Floor lampIf you've converted your garage into a workspace or additional living space, you may need a little more to liven up the area. A simple floor lamp can do just that! It serves as a source of ambient lighting and an additional piece of furniture that can add aesthetic appeal to your converted garage.10. Outdoor wall lightsYou can set these lights up on either side of your garage to help you see and make your way around better. Stylish outdoor garage lighting like these wall lights will really open your area up. Plus, it'll make it safer to walk around since you won't have to worry about accidentally tripping on anything.Looking for the best lighting for your garage?Good, cost-effective lighting for garage is essential to your safety, convenience, and productivity. Experiment with different light sources and fixtures to see what fits your style best. By using these garage lighting tips, you can transform your garage from a drab appendage into a cosy extension of your home.At Sparks Direct, we offer a wide range of high-quality lighting solutions that are perfect for illuminating your garage and making it a safe and functional space. Whether you're looking for bright overhead lighting, wall-mounted fixtures, or energy-efficient LED bulbs, we have everything you need to create the perfect lighting scheme for your garage. 

Energy Bills going Up: Lighting Tips for Saving Energy and Money

In light of the energy bill increases coming up later this year, here are some lighting tips for saving both energy and money.On one hand, the use of LED lamps drastically reduces the amount of energy one uses at home.On the other hand, there are quite a few things one can do in order to save energy and money, thus reducing the energy bills considerably. Why are the Energy Bills Going up in 2022?By now, everyone knows that, due to a multitude of reasons both nationally and internationally, energy prices are rising, and there's a further rise in energy bills expected later this year.Ofgem put out a press release saying that the price cap will increase by £693 from April, and most homeowners and renters are quite worried about the upcoming winter.The energy crisis is an ongoing shortage of energy across the world, both in the UK and in Europe, and it affects our country very much.Here are the main reasons the energy bills are going up in 2022:The energy crisis: as countries began to recover from the pandemic, demand for gas started to increase and, unfortunately, it could not be met due to a shortage in supply - thus the gas price increased in 2021. This problem was made worse by the renewable sources (wind and solar) which produce less power, and by the cold weather during winter months which forces people to turn their heating up. Russia's invasion of Ukraine threatened supplies and drove up the prices even further since Russia is one of the world's largest producers of oil and gas. Energy companies went bust: some of the energy suppliers in the UK went out of business due to the increase in gas prices. British consumers who had to move from failed energy suppliers are paying more per month because so many energy providers went out of business.The "energy price cap" was introduced in January 2019 by Ofgem because of concerns that many people were paying too much for their energy.Ofgem caps the maximum amount energy suppliers can charge for their energy.This energy cap can is reviewed twice a year, but recently Ofgem decided to review it every three months so that the market may be stabilised.The change, Ofgem says, allows energy companies to adjust bills more quickly in response to the prices they are charged by wholesale suppliers.The record increase in global gas prices - up to 54% - caused not only worries among homeowners but also an increase in energy bills. 6 Lighting Tips for Saving Energy and MoneyAs we are approaching the last half of the year and the long winter nights are coming, especially with the increase in the energy bills, we need to be aware of some things we can do to reduce these bills.There are some simple lighting tips - tips which relate to reducing energy and money spent on lighting - that help us save energy and money. Switch off the lights when you're not using them or you leave the room. This is the simplest tip but the one most easy to forget. If you leave the room, make sure you turn off the light or the lights; don't think that you'll be back in a few minutes - simply switch it off. And make sure you switch off ALL the lights, both the ceiling lights, the wall lights, and the floor lamps or table lamps. It is estimated that you can save as much as £20-40 per year just by switching off the lights.Switch to LED lamps everywhere. You may be surprised to find out that some of your wall lamps, ceiling lights, or table lamps may still use a halogen lamp or an incandescent lamp. We have been advising all our customers to switch to LED wherever possible; now this advice is a must! Even the picture lights which use a special lamp can be switched to LED lamps to reduce energy consumption and save on energy bills.Reduce the number of light fittings that are ON. If you have the ceiling light on, you may not need the table lamp on also; similarly, if you have the table lamp on, why leave the ceiling light on? Though you may use LED lamps in all your light fittings, the energy consumption of these light fittings add up, so it is advisable to reduce the number of light fittings you use. Install a time delay switch for light fittings in the hallway or corridor. A time delay switch allows the light to be on for a set amount of time, after which the light is turned off automatically. This is for corporate areas such as staircases, hallways, etc. A time lag switch can help you save energy and money, thus reducing your energy bills. Use PIR sensors or Timers for outdoor lights. We advise purchasing outdoor lights with PIR (presence detector) and/or using timers for the outdoor light fittings. It is quite a waste of energy and money to leave the front door light on the whole night, no matter how energy-saving the light bulb may be. Why not install a PIR wall lamp or a PIR flood light as security lights outdoor? These will turn on only when presence is detected, and they will be off the rest of the time, thus saving energy and money. Consider using transparent shades and clean the shades. Table lamps and pendant lights offer nice, diffused light, and we love the ambience they create. However, if the shade is quite dark, there needs to be a higher wattage lamp being used, which costs more. Why not switch to a more transparent shade to save more energy and money off your bills? And don't forget to clean your lamp shads regularly so that light may shine bright and not be blocked by dust and other impurities. Conclusion and ReferencesThere are many more specific tips on reducing the lighting bill at home, and there is a long list of tips on reducing energy at the office or in commercial environments.However, the above six tips are the simplest tips for reducing the lighting bill, and we all can do them without investing too much.At Sparks, we offer a wide range of LED lamps and LED lights to help you reduce energy consumption.To see them for yourself, visit us either online or at our lighting showroom in North London. Further references on the energy crisis and reducing your lighting bill:BBC article on the energy crisis: what is the energy price cap, how might the bills go up, the energy price cap forecast, using smart meters, the fuel bill breakdown, and how this affects us; also, how to get help with the bills. Tips on saving energy and lighting - reducing the lighting bills.Ofgem press release: Price cap to increase by £693 from April.Energy Saving Trust article on, Why are energy bills going up?Factcheck: why are the energy bills going up? (via channel 4)Bright ideas to save energy and money (via energy label).

Guide to Choosing the LED Light Colour Temperature You Need

We used to rely on trusty halogen lamps or classical incandescent lamps, but their time is over; we now need to choose the light colour temperature that we need for our LED lamps. The GU10 halogen lamps and the E27 or E14 incandescent bulbs used to be quite simple to use and replace, and their price has gone down after a while. But we are now in a new age, the age of energy saving, the age in which we use LED lamps to save not just on the electricity bill but also save the planet. However, the LED lamps do not all offer the same light colour: they now can be programmed or set to offer a particular kind of colour in a chart of light colour temperature. What are the Light Colour Temperatures for LED Lamps?If you want to change your old halogen or incandescent lamp and wanted to get a like-for-like replacement, you may be surprised to find out that such lamps are no longer for sale. What you will discover, however, is that there are energy-saving alternatives to these high-energy-consumption bulbs. There is a LED lamp that can replace the GU10 halogen lamp, and there's an E14 (small Edison Screw) and E27 (large Edison Screw) LED lamp to replace the incandescent lamps. But this time you need to choose both the light colour temperature and the wattage. Here are the most popular light colour temperatures for LED lamps:Warm white light: from 2000K to 3000KNeutral white light: from 4000K to 4500KDaylight white: 6000K - 6500KThe Correlated Colour Temperature (CCT) is measured in degrees Kelvin - from 1000K to 10.000K. The lower the Kelvin temperature is, the warmer the light is, and the higher number of Kelvins, the brighter/whiter it is. For example, the candle lamp from 10 years ago offered a colour temperature of approx. 2000K, a halogen lamp would offer either 3000K (when it was yellowish) or 4000K (when it was blueish), and the sunlight offers approx. 6000K light. The higher the colour temperature of a LED lamp, the whiter the light appears. Note: Philips calls warm white around 2700K, neutral white around 4000K, and cool white at 5000K or more. Also, via Wikipedia, we see an enriched version of the categorization of the different lighting colour temperatures. The question is, what is the light colour temperature you need for your lamp?LED Lamps Colour Temperatures and Where to Use ThemIt can be confusing where to use a cool white lamp and where to use daylight or a warm white lamp. This didn't use to be a problem, but now the home user and office worker alike are put in front of the dilemma of choosing the light colour temperature for the setting he's in.There's a variety of colour temperatures, and as the households and offices are switched to LED, the colour temperature has to be just right. We need to identify the correlated colour temperature (also called, CCT) of the existing light bulbs and find the LED alternative, the perfect replacement. Based on the room where you need to change the lamp, there are recommended correlated light colour temperatures for the LED lamps. Remember, the colour temperature of the lamps you use has an important impact on the way we feel and the functionality of the space we use and the activities we perform there. Where should we use Warm White LED Lamps?Warm white light refers to CCT of 2000K - 3000K, and it is more relaxing, calming, and inviting. It is recommended to use warm white LED lamps in locations such as the bedroom, the bathroomthe dining roomthe living room decorative lightinghospitality ambient lightingWherever we need to create a warm, inviting glow, we should use a warm white LED lamp. In the bedroom, for example, we should always use warm white light, because the cool white light can disrupt our circadian rhythm and can negatively affect the quality of our sleep. In the bathroom, similarly, when we use a warm white light, warmer tones are more flattering and relaxing. When it comes to the dining room lighting, it is recommended not only to use warm white lights but also dimmable lamps, so that you can adjust the lighting as appropriate. Similarly, in hospitality lighting and decorative lighting, warmer light colours are recommended. Light fittings that use warm white light are table lamps, floor lamps, pendants, chandeliers, and downlights. Cool White LED Lamps: where to use them and why?The cool white LED lamps, or the cool white colour temperature is recommended in settings where we need to stay alert and focused. At the office, for example, it is recommended to use cooler temperatures, since we need to focus on work and concentrate on the tasks at hand. Similarly, in the kitchen, we can use cool white light to help us stay awake while making breakfast or dinner. Sometimes even in the bathroom, you can use a cool white light to keep you alert in the morning. Some of the locations where cool white LED lamps are recommended are office/work environments, accent lightingbathroom lightingbasement lightingtask lighting garage lightingPlease bear in mind, however, that the correlated colour temperature you need depends on the task or activity to be performed, so if you need to stay more alert in the bathroom, then cool white light can be used, but if you just want a relaxing atmosphere in the bathroom, the warm white light is recommended. Here is an example of a cool white LED lamp and a cool white LED fitting.Daylight LED Light Bulbs and where to Use themThe daylight colour in LED lamps is >5000K, basically 6000K and 6500K. Such lamps emit colour similar to the sunlight, a colour that is not just yellowish (warm white) or blueish (cool white) but whiteish (daylight). Locations, where daylight colour temperature can be used, are security lightinggarages lighting display areas - display lightingtask lighting. The LED flood lights used as security lighting outdoor can offer daylight CCT, shining a bright sun-like light to light the path or expose the intruders. Similarly, if you want to highlight a display or shed light in the garage, you can use daylight LED lamps. Such light is crisp and invigorating, and many task light fittings and security lights use it. They are the preferred light colour temperature in industrial and commercial settings and applications. ConclusionOne of the most common questions we have been asked at Sparks for the past few years, as we make the transition from halogen and incandescent lamps to LED lamps, is what colour temperature the LED lamps should be. As LED technology is developing, there are more and more options for the increasing number of settings, scenes, activities, and tasks. To find out more about what kind of colour temperature you need for your LED lamps, you can give us a call or contact us via email. Note: we now have CCT lamps where you can choose the LED colour temperature before installing it, and if you change your mind later, you can change it again. See these CCT lights here. 

Small Steps to Reducing the Carbon Footprint by Switching to LEDs at Home

Switching all the old incandescent bulbs in your garage (for instance) to LEDs may seem like a small task. However, they say all the little things count and this could apply to one of the most drastic challenges facing our planet: climate change. The UN recently issued a  warning stating we only have 12 years to change our behaviour to avert a ‘climate change catastrophe’. The world is currently 1 degree over its pre-industrial level, and devastating effects can already be seen with dramatic weather events: from hurricanes in the U.S. to record droughts in South Africa. If all this world-scale peril sounds daunting, don’t get overwhelmed. There are some easy steps that you can make to reduce your carbon footprint and contribute to lowering the global temperature to the 1.5% level agreed upon at the Paris Agreement in 2015. Helping the planet with LEDs: making a complete switch to LEDs You can contribute to helping save the environment right now - the first step is simply thinking about how many light bulbs are currently being used in your home. Next, try and guess how many of these are LEDs - and hopefully the answer should be most of them.  For instance, have you made the switch to LED strip-lights along your countertops, shelves and cupboards? What about your exterior lighting? These often exert huge amounts of electricity, and LED Floodlights are shown to save up to 65% in energy savings.  At the top of most ‘how to help the environment’ lists is using energy-efficient light bulbs - LEDs. Studies have shown that making your home more energy-efficient has massively contributed to reducing emissions and helping the environment. Here are some additional reasons for making the switch to LEDs: On average, they are brighter than their older counterparts, producing 63 lumens compared to a paltry 12 lumens from traditional bulbs. They use 90% less energy than their equivalent incandescent or halogen light bulb. They have lower running costs, running approximately 20 times longer. They provide instant, bright lighting. The benefits of a complete switch over to LEDs Have you ever thought how many light fittings in your home are LEDs? The truth is many people have slowly been making the switch following the EU’s ban on halogen light bulbs, which took effect in late 2018, and their phasing out of incandescent bulbs since 2009. However, it is likely that you are still losing energy and money with inefficient bulbs throughout your house. It is worth drawing inspiration from the laudable achievement of British couple Pete and Linda Powell, who estimate they are saving over £400 per year, having switched almost all their bulbs to LEDs in their grand Yorkshire home (see the source below). The energy bill for their five-bedroom house used to rack up to an average of £1,344 a year prior to their mini "lighting revolution". Now it is costing them just £700 (approximately). So what is putting people off from switching to LED lighting? One thing may be that many feel uncomfortable with the low-wattage levels given by LED lamps, having become accustomed to the standard 40W, 60W, 75W and even 100W ratings of traditional bulbs. However, the only reason LED lamp wattages are so much lower is their increased efficiency - they don't need to waste as much wattage. The general rule-of-thumb to keep in mind when buying LEDs is simply to multiply the LEDs wattage by 10 to find its equivalent traditional light in brightness. Saving money while you help save the planet - is there any downside? Some may point to the actual cost of buying LEDs to replace every single bulb in the average household and also install them. It cost Pete and Linda Powell around £500, meaning they made their money back in well under a year - and this was in a large 5 bedroom home. The couple have set a precedent that seems well worth following for the average consumer: make the switch now and see the benefits in the medium/long-term. There is of course the added satisfaction of knowing you are doing your small bit to help global temperatures, before it is too late. As one recent BBC article made clear, improving energy efficiency within our households has actually done more to help the environment than the switch to renewable energy. It has been estimated that by following EU-set guidelines on products such as light bulbs, fridges and vacuum cleaners, energy demand has been reduced by a staggering 103TWh since 2005. Compare this to the estimated 95 TWh cut by substituting fossil fuels to renewables in the same time. While both solutions are needed to make the necessary changes to fight global warming, the switch over to LEDs is a practical step every single one of us can make. Articles that helped inspire this article: The Greenage on the various reasons  you should make the switch to LEDs. The Telegraph, with a piece on how a British couple successfully made the switch to a completely LED lit home. The Guardian on how we need to take action now, to stop the devastating effects of climate change. We found the top ranked way to save the planet Earth at 50waystohelp. Do you think making a complete switch over to LEDs in your home is practical? Tweet us  your thoughts @sparksdirect

Quick Guide to Choosing the Colour Temperature of LED Lights

Many customers have asked us to advise them on what is the correct colour temperature for their LED lights; in this article, we present a quick guide to choosing the colour temperature of the LED lights.Keep reading to find a quick guide on:Warm White vs Cool White - what's the difference?Where should we use Warm White Lights?Where should we use Cool White Lights?Where should we use Daylight Lights?Conclusion: what colour temperature do we need? Before the LED lighting revolution, it used to be so simple: incandescent lights, halogen lamps, and fluorescent lamps; now, things are more complicated, for every LED lamp has a certain Wattage, Lumen output, and Colour Temperature. It used to be quite easy before, when the halogen lamp reached its end of life, you would simply change it to another halogen lamp. Similarly with the incandescent lamps and the low voltage lamps. Nowadays, however, you need to make sure you order the right brightness, the correct colour temperature, and the exact lamp beam so that all these match the existing lamps on the ceiling or the wall. There are many guides, comparisons and charts out there related to the colour temperature of LED lights, and with the recent advancement in LED technology, there are now CCT selectable lamps, which are available via Sparks here. But in this article, we would like to explain the difference between warm white, cool white, extra warm white, daylight, and other colour temperatures that are mentioned on the box of the LED lamp or the integrated LED light fitting. Quick Guide to the LED Lamps Colour TemperatureWarm White vs Cool White - what's the difference?What is the difference between warm white light and cool white light? The colour of light emitted by a lamp can be warm or cool, on a spectrum, depending on the need. The CCT, the Correlated Colour Temperature, in lighting, describes how the colour of the light appears from an LED Lamp or LED light fitting, and it is measured in Kelvins (K). There is a scale from 1000K (which is a very red light) to 10.000K (which is a very blue light). The higher you go on the Kelvin scale, the closer the light emitted resembles blue daylight. The higher the colour temperature, the "cooler" a lamp will look, that is, the more blue-ish the light emitted is. Here is a quick guide to the Kelvins, the Type of lamp used, the colour temperature, the appearance, and the place it is used. Kelvins (K) AppearanceHow it Looks/feelsLight TypeLocation1000Kcandlelight redyellow light1800Kvintage-look filament lamp,orange lightultra warm whitevintage lighting2000K-3000KOrange to yellow or gold white lightCalming light, Cosy, Inviting, and Intimate LightWarm WhiteBedroom, living room, dining room, decorative lights, garden lights3000K-4500Kbright white, blueish whitebright light, vibrant light, inviting, blueish white, crispCool Whitebathroom, home office, work environment, kitchen, commercial properties, outdoor lights4500K-6500Kvery bright whiteappears as daylight, illuminating, powerful bright lightdaylightfloodlight, security light, garage and workshop, hospital, schools6500K-7000Kcool daylight10000Kblue skyblue lightIn simple terms, the colour temperature of an LED lamp is based on how the colour of the heated metal changes as its temperature is increased, from red to yellow and then blue.The range of colours at different temperatures has become useful for describing the colour tint of white light. At Sparks we stock a variety of warm white LED Lamps, extra warm white LED lamps, cool white LED lamps, and daylight LED lamps. The difference between warm white and cool white is that the warm white light is more yellowish while the cool white light is more blueish. Where to use Warm White LED Lights? What about Cool White LED Lamps?Warm white and cool white are the most popular colours of lights; warm white can be either 2700K or 3000K, and cool white is 4000K. Daylight, for instance, is 6500K, and it mimics the daylight. The question is, where is it suitable for warm white light to be used, and what about the cool white light? Based on our experience with hundreds of customers and on the vast knowledge out there related to colour temperature in LED Lamps, here is our advice.Warm White Lights - All Around the HomeWarm white lights are recommended to be used at home, especially in the living room, dining room, and wherever at home you want to create a warm atmosphere, an inviting and relaxing light. The 3000K and 2700K warm white lights offer an orangey-yellow light, similar to what the older incandescent or halogen lamps used to offer. They are ideal for use in the bedroom for ceiling, wall, or table lighting, and you can also use them in the living room, the dining room, the conservatory, and even in the garden as summer lights for example. To create a warm atmosphere at home, warm white light bulbs are recommended for the table lamps, bedside lamps, and desk lights. You can say that there is soft white light between 2700K and 3000K, and the warm white is between 3000K and 4000K on the Kelvin scale. Check out the GU10 warm white lights, G9 warm white lights, E27/ES warm white LED lamps, and the E14/SES warm white LED lamps available at Sparks. Cool White Lights - In the Office and in Busy AreasWhere are the cool white lights suitable to be installed and used? They emit a brighter and more vibrant light, a more blueish light, and they appear closer to daylight. It is recommended to use cool white lamps in more lively areas, where you want to make sure people stay awake and do activities. For example, you can use a cool white LED lamp in the bathroom, in the kitchen, and in utility rooms at home. Also, they are recommended to be used in the office and other work environments. Also, you can use cool white lights in the garage or other places where you need brighter light for completing tasks. The cool white lights mimic the light colour temperature offered by the fluorescent tube lights. Wherever there used to be a fluorescent lamp, the cool white lights are recommended. They are perfect for commercial properties. You can say that cool white is between 4000K and 5000K on the Kelvin scale. See the cool white G9 lamps, E27/ES lamps, E14/SES lamps, and GU10 lamps at Sparks. Also, check out the cool white LED panels, ideal for office lighting, and the cool white LED battens.Daylight Lights - OutdoorsThe brightest and closest to the daylight are the daylight light fittings and daylight LED lamps, 6000K and 6500K. Where are the daylights most suitable to be used? It is recommended to use them where daylight is required. For example, you can use daylight lights and LED lamps outdoors in the yard, forecourt, floodlighting, security lighting, and sports venues. At home you can safely use daylight lighting to light up the driveway or as garden lights. You can accentuate or highlight features outdoors with daylight lighting, but indoors it is recommended to use cool white when you do the same. We can say that daylight is between 5000K and 6500K on the Kelvin scale. Such light shines bright and exposes every detail, hence it is the preferred light temperature for hospitals, large offices, and classrooms. At Sparks we distribute a wide range of daylight flood lights, daylight LED striplights, daylight security lights, and even daylight LED lamps and tubes. Conclusion: What colour Temperature do we need at Home or Office?In conclusion, you can say that it is up to the preference of the homeowner and the atmosphere you want to create in different venues and rooms around the house or at the office. If you want to create a more relaxed atmosphere, warm white lights are recommended. If you want to create an atmosphere for studying, working, and doing activities, cool white lights are the best. If you want to mimic the daylight in order to highlight or light up the driveway or the facade of the house, daylight is the most suitable. If you want to have a table lamp for reading a book or light up a living space, warm white lights are recommended, since they offer a more relaxing light. but if you want the people visiting or working in a room to be alert and have higher visibility, cool white is more recommended. This is valid for both indoor and outdoor lighting. For more information on the colour temperature you need, do not hesitate to contact us.Disclaimer: the images used for the different color temperatures have been taken from the world wide web - they were not created by us. If they are bound by copyright, we can take them down - simply let us know.

What's the Real Problem with the Outdoor Lights using PIR Detectors?

It's all about saving energy plus saving money when it comes to outdoor lights. The design is also important, but sometimes in the dark all you need is a good light fitting mounted on the wall, giving enough light for you to see the pathway or the door. Or all you need is a flood light in the back garden that would switch itself on when the presence of a person is detected. More and more light fittings outdoor work together with a PIR, a presence detector. What's the Problem with Outdoor Lights with PIRs? The principle of a presence detector unit (a PIR) is that it saves you energy and time - when it detects the presence of a person, it switches the light ON, and when no one is there, the light is OFF. But when it comes to outdoor lighting and the IP rating and waterproof and other standards like these, it is not so easy to fit a PIR unit with the wall lights. First of all, the IP rating will be lost if you drill into the case of the light fitting. Also, if the PIR malfunctions or becomes defect, the light fitting will also be lost. Lighting manufacturers are still struggling with this problem. Any Solution for the PIR Triggered Outdoor Lighting? So, what is the solution? We asked our specialists here in the showroom and, no matter how much we want to have a wall-mounted light fitting with a PIR (so that we will never worry about turning ON or OFF the fitting), the manufacturers today don't have a proper solution for this. For the wall lights though it is recommended to use light fittings like the 7408GB Scenic Wall Lamp and AX0562 Homefield Wall Light - together with an energy-saving light bulb. This is the best way to save energy while still saving some money on the outdoor lights. When it comes to flood lights though, you can get some really good fittings like ES95 30W LED flood light with PIR integrated! You can always use a wall-mounted flood light or a garden light with PIR integrated! See the full range of PIR LED flood lights.What is your opinion on this? Is it necessary for the wall lights to also have PIR integrated? Or is it OK to just have them energy saving and low cost? Let us know in the comments and make sure you visit our website at Sparks Direct.