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Xpelair C4TSR 100mm Simply Silent Bathroom Extractor Fan with Timer, 2 Speeds, Square/Round Baffle in White

Xpelair C4TSR 100mm Simply Silent Bathroom Extractor Fan with Timer, 2 Speeds, Square/Round Baffle in White

This is the Xpelair C4TSR 4"/100mm Simply Silent Contour bathroom extractor fan complete with square..

Model: C4TSR

£39.00 Ex. VAT

Silent 100 Design Silver Bathroom Fan with Adjustable Timer IP45 Quiet Toilet Fan SILDES100T

Silent 100 Design Silver Bathroom Fan with Adjustable Timer IP45 Quiet Toilet Fan SILDES100T

This is a Silent 100 Design silver bathroom / toilet fan IP45 rated with an adjustable timer. This E..

Model: SILD10TS

£78.12 Ex. VAT

Silent 100 Design White Bathroom Fan with Adjustable Timer IP45 Quiet Toilet Fan SILDES100T

Silent 100 Design White Bathroom Fan with Adjustable Timer IP45 Quiet Toilet Fan SILDES100T

This is a Silent 100 Design white bathroom / toilet fan IP45 rated with an adjustable timer. This En..

Model: SILD10TW

£56.69 Ex. VAT

Silent 100 Design White Bathroom Fan with Timer and Humidistat IP45 Quiet Toilet Fan Envirovent SILDES100HT

Silent 100 Design White Bathroom Fan with Timer and Humidistat IP45 Quiet Toilet Fan Envirovent SILDES100HT

This is the Silent 100 Design bathroom fan in white complete with an adjustable timer and adjustable..

Model: SILD10HW

£75.56 Ex. VAT

Silent 100 Design Silver Bathroom Fan with Timer and Humidistat IP45 Quiet Toilet Fan Envirovent SILDES100HTS

Silent 100 Design Silver Bathroom Fan with Timer and Humidistat IP45 Quiet Toilet Fan Envirovent SILDES100HTS

This is the Silent 100 Design bathroom fan in silver complete with an adjustable timer and adjustabl..

Model: SILD1HTS

£116.82 Ex. VAT

Envirovent SILDES100GK Swarovski Silent Design 100 Bathroom Ventilation Fan in Grey with Timer 8W IP45 100mm Quiet Fan

Envirovent SILDES100GK Swarovski Silent Design 100 Bathroom Ventilation Fan in Grey with Timer 8W IP45 100mm Quiet Fan

This is the Envirovent SILDES100GK, the Swarovski Silent Design 100 ventilation fan in grey with tim..

Model: SILDTSWA

£117.98 Ex. VAT

Black Front Cover for Envirovent Silent Design 100 Ventilation Fan (cover only)

Black Front Cover for Envirovent Silent Design 100 Ventilation Fan (cover only)

This is a black front cover for the Envirovent Silent Design 100 ventilation fan.  Finish..

Model: SILDBLAC

£39.06 Ex. VAT

Envirovent Silent SILMV160/100T Ultra Quiet 100mm In-Line Duct Fan with Timer for Bathroom

Envirovent Silent SILMV160/100T Ultra Quiet 100mm In-Line Duct Fan with Timer for Bathroom

This is the Envirovent Silent SILMV160/100T ultra quiet 100mm in-line duct fan complete with timer, ..

Model: SILMV10T

£91.58 Ex. VAT

Gold Front Cover for Envirovent Silent Design 100 Ventilation Fan (cover only)

Gold Front Cover for Envirovent Silent Design 100 Ventilation Fan (cover only)

This is a gold front cover for the Envirovent Silent Design 100 ventilation fan.  Finish:..

Model: SILDGOLD

£39.06 Ex. VAT

Grey Front Cover for Envirovent Silent Design 100 Ventilation Fan (cover only)

Grey Front Cover for Envirovent Silent Design 100 Ventilation Fan (cover only)

This is a grey front cover for the Envirovent Silent Design 100 ventilation fan.  Finish:..

Model: SILDGRAY

£39.06 Ex. VAT

Envirovent SIL100S Silent 100mm Standard White Extractor Fan for Bathroom and Toilet

Envirovent SIL100S Silent 100mm Standard White Extractor Fan for Bathroom and Toilet

This is the EnviroVent Silent 100 mm extractor fan - silent and stylish bathroom extractor fan, the ..

Model: SIL100S

£37.32 Ex. VAT

Silent 100mm Bathroom Extractor Fan with Adjustable Timer, EnviroVent Silent 100 Toilet fan

Silent 100mm Bathroom Extractor Fan with Adjustable Timer, EnviroVent Silent 100 Toilet fan

This is the EnviroVent Silent 100 mm extractor fan with adjustable timer - silent and stylish bathro..

Model: SIL100T

£39.75 Ex. VAT

Silent 100mm Silver Bathroom Fan with Adjustable Timer, EnviroVent Silent 100 Extractor Fan

Silent 100mm Silver Bathroom Fan with Adjustable Timer, EnviroVent Silent 100 Extractor Fan

This fan is part of the range of 100mm domestic axial extract fans for wall or ceiling installations..

Model: SIL100TS

£70.21 Ex. VAT

Silent 100mm Bathroom Fan with Adjustable Timer and Humidistat, EnviroVent Axial Extractor Fan

Silent 100mm Bathroom Fan with Adjustable Timer and Humidistat, EnviroVent Axial Extractor Fan

This fan is part of the range of 100mm domestic axial extract fans for wall or ceiling installations..

Model: SIL100HT

£81.89 Ex. VAT

100mm dMEV Continually Running Smart Extractor Fan Whole House Ventilation, Greenwood Unity CV2

100mm dMEV Continually Running Smart Extractor Fan Whole House Ventilation, Greenwood Unity CV2

The Greenwood Airvac CV2GIP Unity Any Room 100mm Smart Air Extractor Fan ideal for bathroom or the k..

Model: CV2GIP

£85.90 Ex. VAT

150mm Silent Kitchen Ventilation Fan, IP45 29W 78 l/s Whisper Quiet Extractor Fan

150mm Silent Kitchen Ventilation Fan, IP45 29W 78 l/s Whisper Quiet Extractor Fan

This fan is a 150mm silent extractor fan from Envirovent, a whisper quiet kitchen fan. This range of..

Model: SIL150S

£102.95 Ex. VAT

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Related Articles

How to Choose the Right Ventilation Fan at Home (Manrose Guide)

When it comes to domestic ventilation, we all need help; thanks to Manrose, we now have a guide on, How to Choose a Ventilation Fan at Home. We read their guide and we would like to present the main points recommended by this ventilation fans manufacturer as it relates to ventilation at home. Ventilation is absolutely necessary, and it is good to know the following matters related to ventilation at home:What are the Problems caused by Poor or No Ventilation?What do Regulations say about Ventilation at Home?Where should we Install a Ventilation Fan at home?What Ventilation Fan is Required for the Minimum Air Changes Required per Hour?How to Choose the Right Ventilation Fan at HomeWhat options are there for Ventilation at Home?What are the Problems caused by Poor or No Ventilation?If the ventilation fans are not working or nonexistent, or if there is poor ventilation in a home, there are a few problems that may arise. First, there is the stale air which we all hate. Stale air can be caused by things such as cooking smells, odours remaining in the bathroom, a general lack of ventilation around the house, smoking, and a damp atmosphere. Stale air is not good for health and is very unpleasant to breathe.Stale air can cause a certain level of discomfort and poses a risk of respiratory illness and general poor health. Condensation is another problem caused by poor ventilation at home. When the steam from the kitchen or the bathroom spreads in the house and finds cooler surfaces around the house, there is condensation. We may try to conserve heat by sealing the windows and keeping them closed, therefore reducing natural ventilation; this causes more condensation. The consequences of condensation in a home include mould growth, peeling wallpaper, and even severe structural damage such as wood rot or dampness. What do Regulations say about Ventilation at Home?According to the Building Regulations Document F1 (2006 Edition), we know the importance of ventilation. Furthermore, these regulations stipulate that mechanical ventilation must be installed in kitchens, bathrooms (or showers), and toilets. The ventilation fans installed need to meet or exceed the current Building Regulations so that humidity is removed at the source before it can reach the cooler part of the dwelling. In particular, what is recommended and even required by the Building Regs are as follows:Intermittent fans - they operate on an "as required" basis and are turned on or off with the light switch or via other control (such as a pull cord switch). These are the regular fans installed on the wall or ceiling that provide high extraction for a short period of time when turned on. In the bathroom or shower room, the regulations require a fan capable of extracting min. 15 litres per second when installed. In a toilet, separate from a bathroom, the regulations require a fan capable of extracting a minimum of 6 litres per second when installed. In the kitchen, the regulations require a fan capable of extracting min. 60 litres per second when installed. And in the utility rooms, the regulations require a fan capable of extracting min. 30 litres per second when installed. Continuous Fans - they work all the time to extract excess moisture and stale air at low extraction rates throughout the day, and they have a boost function when humidity levels rise. They are becoming more common, for they ensure better indoor air quality while using less energy than intermittent fans, thus being more cost-effective to run. The Regulations regarding these in terms of air extraction rates are as follows: in the bathroom or shower room - min. 8 litres per second, in the toilet (separate from a bathroom) min. 6 litres per second, in the kitchen - min. 13 litres per second, and in utility rooms - max. 8 litres per second.Where should we Install a Ventilation Fan at home?The location of the ventilation fan is very important; it is of utmost importance to site the fan correctly. A ventilation fan needs to be always sited in the furthest window or wall from the main source of air replacement in order to avoid short-circuiting the airflow. Also, it needs to be located as high as possible in the window or wall nearest to smells or steam, but not directly above eye-level grills or cooker hoods. If a room in the house contains a gas boiler or any other fuel-burning device with a non-balanced flue, it is imperative that there's enough replacement air to prevent fumes from being drawn down the flue when the fan is extracting to its utmost capacity. Furthermore, according to the IEE Regulations in the UK, conventional mains voltage fans in a bathroom or shower must be located in places where they cannot be touched by a person using the bath or the shower, as well as away from any water spray. SELV fans (Safety Extra Low Voltage Fans, 12V fans) are specifically designed for safe ventilation of toilets, bathrooms, and shower rooms. They can be fitted within the area with splashing water (see their full specs) without any risk of electric shock. What Ventilation Fan is Required for the Minimum Air Changes Required per Hour?When considering where and what fan to install in a particular room at home, we need to know what is the minimum air changes required per hour. In order to calculate the correct air changes required for a room, you need to know the room volume in cubic metres, which is basically the length x width x height of the room, which needs to be multiplied by the number of air changes required. According to the current Building Regulations, here are the minimum air changes required per hour:Bathroom & Shower Rooms - 3 air changes/hBedrooms - 2 air changes/hCafés - 10 air changes/hCanteens - 8 air changes/hCellars - 3 air changes/hChanging Rooms with Showers - 15 air changes/hConference Rooms - 8 air changes/hGarages - 6 air changes/hHairdressing Salons - 10 air changes/hHalls & Landings - 3 air changes/hHospital Rooms - 4 air changes/hLaundries & Launderettes - 10 air changes/hLiving & Other Domestic Rooms - 3 air changes/hMeeting Rooms - 4 air changes/hOffices - 6 air changes/hRestaurants & Bars - 6 air changes/hSchool Rooms - 2 air changes/hShops - 8 air changes/hSports Facilities - 6 air changes/hStore Room - 3 air changes/hToilets – Domestic - 3 air changes/hToilets – Public - 10 air changes/hUtility Rooms - 15 air changes/hWorkshops - 6 air changes/hHow to Choose the Right Ventilation Fan at HomeIn light of all the requirements and specifications above, we need to find out in particular how to choose the right ventilation fan at home. When we choose the right ventilation fan, we need to bear in mind the types of air extractor fans and the types of switching/turning on for the fans available. Type of Air Extractor Fan for HomeAxial Fans - the axial fans are designed to move air over short distances of up to 2m ducting. For example, you need an axial fan if you install it on the wall, the window, or the ceiling and the exit is straight through or the ducting is under 2m long. The axial fans come in 4-inch (100mm, the most popular ones), 5-inch (125mm), 6-inch (150mm), and larger sizes.Centrifugal Fans - these are designed to move air over longer distances, performing well against the pressure caused by longer lengths of ducting and resistance by grilles. They are not as popular as the axial fans but sometimes are recommended to use. When ducting vertically, it is recommended that a condensation trap is used. Type of Switching On/off for the Ventilation FansStandard ventilation fans: the standard model fans are wired to the wall switch for remote switching through either a wall light or a separate switch. They are the most common ones. Timer ventilation fans: the timer models have a built-in adjustable time delay operated by the light switch. The time delay can be adjusted at installation, and these are suitable for locations where you need some extra ventilation even after the light is turned off. Pull-cord ventilation fans: the pull-cord fans have a pull-cord switch to be turned on/off when needed via this means. Humidity ventilation fans: the humidity models with built-in adjustable sensor turns the fan on when a certain threshold of humidity is sensed. They are automatically turned ON or OFF when the humidity sensor detects the humidity levels. PIR or Microwave Sensor ventilation fans: the PIR models are sensitive to movement. When someone enters the room, the fan turns on, and when presence is not detected, it is turned off.What options are there for Ventilation at Home?On our website, we have a wide range of ventilation systems available, and the three main manufacturers we distribute are Airflow, Manrose, and Envirovent. For further information concerning what ventilation fan you require at home, do not hesitate to contact us. You can also visit the dedicated sections for Airflow Extractor Fans, Manrose Extractor Fans, and Envirovent Extractor Fans.

ECO cMEV: Continuous Ventilation for Your Home

As more and more people opt to work from the comfort of their own homes, millions are now faced with the challenge of transforming their houses into versatile spaces that are comfortable enough to relax in, yet still lively enough to get some work done.One brilliant way to keep your home fresh is to keep out damp and stale air. Poor ventilation leads to old, moist air lingering as condensation on your walls and furniture. This, in turn, causes dampness and mould - not exactly the most appealing of house features.Fortunately, you can now keep dampness at bay with a reliable ventilation system. Continuous ventilation systems are ideal for home use since they allow you to keep your entire area well-ventilated without any hassle.What is ECO dMEV? ECO dMEV is a type of ventilation system used in residential buildings. The ECO dMEV ventilation system is typically installed in individual rooms, such as bathrooms, and is connected to ductwork that runs to an external vent. The units are designed to be easy to install, use, and maintain, and are often used as a more energy-efficient and cost-effective alternative to traditional mechanical ventilation systems in residential buildings.The ecological operation of the ECO dMEV units is achieved by reducing energy consumption and noise levels, as well as providing a higher level of indoor air quality.What does ECO dMEV stand for? The term "ECO dMEV" means "Decentralised Mechanical Extract Ventilation with Ecological operation". It is a low-energy and low-noise ventilation system that is designed to extract moisture, pollutants, and stale air from kitchens, bathrooms, and other wet rooms in a home or office. ECO dMEV units operate continuously and use low-energy, DC (direct current) motors to extract air at a constant rate, which helps to maintain good indoor air quality and prevent the buildup of harmful substances, such as mould and mildew.Mechanical extract ventilation (MEV) is designed to supply air continuously at a low rate. It works by extracting air at multiple points to simultaneously draw moisture out from rooms, particularly wet areas such as bathrooms and kitchens. MEVs are more efficient compared to installing separate fans in each room.How does the ECO dMEV ventilation system work? ECO dMEV is a decentralised mechanical extract ventilation system designed to remove moist and polluted air from individual rooms, such as bathrooms and kitchens, in residential buildings.Installation and connectionThe ECO dMEV unit is installed in the room that needs ventilation, typically in the ceiling or wall, and is connected to a duct that leads to an external vent. Each contains a DC (direct current) motor, which powers a centrifugal fan that extracts air from the room.Extraction of airOnce the unit has been properly installed, it continuously extracts air at a low and constant rate, which helps to maintain good indoor air quality and prevent the buildup of moisture and pollutants that can lead to health problems and possibly destroy your furniture.VentilationECO dMEV continuous ruling ventilation for the home has a humidity sensor and a timer that can be programmed to increase or decrease the ventilation rate based on the level of humidity in the room or the time of day.It is designed to be energy-efficient and cost-effective, using only a small amount of electricity to operate, and operating quietly and unobtrusively. Perfect for those peaceful afternoons at home.What are some advantages of the ECO dMEV continuous ventilation for the home?Continuous ventilation systems, such as ECO dMEV, have several advantages over intermittent ventilation systems as follows.1. Improved indoor air quality.Continuous ventilation systems are designed to maintain a steady flow of fresh air. This helps you keep your home free from any moisture, pollutants, and other contaminants that can lead to poor indoor air quality.A decentralised ventilation unit also eliminates the need to fit every room with a different fan or vent. No more worrying about stale air anywhere in the house!2. Prevention of mould and mildew.The ECO dMEV ventilation system helps to control humidity levels, which can prevent the growth of mould and mildew in the home.Apart from reducing the risk of respiratory problems and other health issues, this will also protect your furniture, clothes, and electronics from becoming overpowered by unsightly mould. Of course, it will also keep your home smelling fresh and welcoming.3. Energy efficiency.These high-quality, high-tech units are designed to be energy-efficient, using low-energy DC motors and operating at a low and constant rate. This can help to reduce energy consumption and save money on energy bills.4. Noise reduction.Hate the constant droning of a regular fan? Continuous ventilation systems operate quietly and unobtrusively. The ECO dMEV does wonders to help reduce noise levels in the home.5. Easy maintenance.Apart from being energy-efficient, these units were also made with your convenience in mind. They were intelligently designed to be easy to install and maintain. The units are typically self-contained and require little maintenance, which can help to save time and money in the long run.What are some examples of continuous ventilation systems?One prime example of a reliable continuous ventilation system for the home is the Envirovent ECO-DMEV-S. This system yields a constant airflow with 5 adjustable trickle speed settings. Each eco-friendly, low-wattage unit is quiet, durable, and suitable for every room in your house. Plus, its minimal, elegant design goes with anything on your wall or ceiling.The Envirovent ECO-DMEV-T 100mm is another exceptional unit. It is a continuous-running ventilation fan but comes with a timer for more personalisation and control. It comes with most of the advantages of the ECO-DMEV-S, including the incredibly quiet operation volume and the ease of maintenance.The ECO dMEV filterless trickle fans were designed to require very low maintenance and to incur minimal life-cycle costs. You may simply remove the cover and wipe the motor clean. These fans are also sensorless, responding only to intelligent microprocessor controls that are linked to the centrifugal fan.Looking for the right ventilation system?Continuous ventilation systems offer several advantages over intermittent ventilation systems, providing a simple and effective way to improve indoor air quality and maintain a healthy living environment.If you’re looking for a high-quality ventilation system to make sure your home stays fresh, ventilated and energy efficient, then an ECO dMEV ventilation system from Sparks Direct is an excellent choice. With a sleek design, low life-cycle cost and impressive sensor-less technology, you'll love how this system completely transforms your environment.

Advice: Dealing with Condensation and Mould Problems in Your Home

When it comes to making sure that your home is as optimised for warmth, energy efficiency, cleanliness, and health as best as possible, excess moisture is the enemy number one! The combination of warmth and moisture provides an ideal breeding ground for mould and rot, creating problems not just aesthetically, but structurally, in the long term. Mould also carries certain health implications for people who are vulnerable, typically the elderly, young and asthmatic. With mould caused by condensation, it’s worth paying attention to the moisture building up in your home.It's not all doom and gloom, however! There’s plenty to be done to begin dealing with moisture, condensation and mould problems in your home. From ventilation extractor fans to spider plants, there are plenty of options to consider to remedy the situation. The key thing is to understand the origins of the problems, fix the symptoms and then start working towards dealing with the core issues. Some moisture is inevitable in the home, but when it’s allowed to run rampant, it can become a major issue, resulting in costly repairs and generally being tricky to deal with. Here’s how to start dealing with mould and condensation problems in your home.What are Condensation and Mould?Condensation and mould come from the same core problem, excess moisture. Condensation happens when warm, moist air hits a cold surface such as a window. Mould is caused by condensation, and flourishes in any environment that is both moist and warm, making a well-heated home with condensation and moisture problems an ideal breeding ground, although condensation mould in the bathroom is often the worst spot. The trouble is, we really like our homes warm and sheltered, with no cold wind blowing through, but sadly mould also prefers that exact environment.As we move into the cooler months, especially with energy prices on the rise, no one wants to be leaving windows open or running the expensive tumble dryer. While air drying clothes and keeping windows shut will help save energy costs and keep warmth in, it’ll also keep moisture trapped inside. This excess moisture can lead to the growth of mould throughout the home, which can be problematic and expensive to deal with.Moisture is an inevitable part of an inhabited home, whether it’s from cooking, showering, drying clothes, ironing, or even just breathing, many aspects of life massively contribute to the overall moisture in a home environment. If you are keeping all those windows shut tight and not implementing any other solutions for your excess moisture, you could end up with some real problems, which is why you need to start dealing with condensation and mould problems in your home.Why is Moisture Such a Problem Indoors? First and foremost, among the risks associated with excessive moisture indoors is mould, specifically black mould. Not only is this costly and troublesome to deal with, but it also presents health risks, particularly for the young or elderly. The spores released by mould may cause breathing difficulties and other health issues. Commonly affected are asthmatics and people with breathing conditions. There are multiple types of mould, with some types being more toxic than others, so it’s always worth staying on top of.Often associated with unsightly black marks on the walls, mould can also lurk behind furniture and within walls, making it harder to identify and therefore deal with. We all know that maintaining a property requires periodic decorating and repainting, however, if you have a moisture problem, you’re going to find yourself redecorating far more often than you should. This is especially an issue in plasterboard, causing ugly sagging and swelling, as well as stains and peeling wallpaper that can make a room look dirty and unkempt. Once moisture starts causing problems on this scale, getting everything fixed and replaced can become extremely expensive, so pay attention to the early warning signs. The damage isn’t just limited to the aesthetic, however, as moisture within your walls can easily result in long-term problems to the structural elements of your property, affecting external walls, causing the timber to swell, rot and loosen nails, as well as cladding issues. All this can prove expensive to fix and rectify, requiring specialists, especially when it comes to deeper mould issues within your walls.Lastly, there’s the energy cost of excessive moisture in the home. For many, with energy costs skyrocketing, this is going to be a major concern. With many homes utilising insulation within the walls to ensure thermal retention and minimise heating costs, the thermal properties of the insulating material can be compromised when it gets wet, making the property much more costly to keep warm.How To Identify Mould and Condensation ProblemsThe easiest way to identify moisture problems within the home is always going to be a humidity detector, allowing you to know exactly how humid and moist your home is, but there are plenty of other signs to look out for too.Excessive condensation on your windows when you wake up in the morning is one of the clearest signs that you’ve got moisture issues in your home. As moisture builds up in the home, caused by simple things like showering, ironing and even breathing, that warm, moist air hits the cold glass of your windows and turns to water droplets. Having a lot of condensation on your windows in the morning is a clear sign the environment in your home is too moist. The worst room is often going to be the bathroom with condensation mould in bathrooms being the most common.Discolouration, stains, and peeling wallpaper can also be a clear sign of condensation and mould problems, as the moisture settles into your walls it can cause plenty of issues. Big, stained patches, bulging or sagging areas, peeling wallpaper, and patches of mould, which can resemble black spots, are all signs of excess moisture in the home, meaning you’ve got to start dealing with condensation and mould problems in your home as soon as possible. Fortunately, we have some solutions for you.  Aside from the everyday life causes, there are several key sources that are worth being aware of, even if they are an inevitable aspect of living in a moist, temperate country. These are mostly unavoidable, but understanding the potential sources is vital for dealing with the effects of moisture in the home.Leaky roofs and walls, ineffective guttering and badly fitted windows and doors all let moisture into the home.Groundwater can rise up through the walls and floor if the damp proofing underneath isn’t doing its job.Leaky plumbing, steamy appliances, and badly sealed showers and baths all release moisture, but worse, they can release the moisture into places you can’t see, such as within your walls.What Can You Be Doing Differently?While it’s next to impossible to completely deal with mould and moisture within the home, there are plenty of things you can be doing to help avoid the problems associated with moisture worsening. These can be as simple as drying your clothes outside instead (if the weather permits!).Try to keep a consistent temperature indoors – spending a little more on heating could help you avoid moisture and dampness issuesDon’t dry clothes inside – if you must, make sure there’s an open window nearby or a ventilation fanMake sure to keep your extraction units on while cooking and showering. It can be worthwhile having them set to come on at intervals or timed to the light switchesHave shorter, cooler showers as condensation mould in bathrooms is commonNever dry clothes over a radiatorMake sure your tumble dryer is properly ventedPeriodically air out spaces within the homeKeep all your furniture pulled away from the wallsPut a lid on your pans while cookingWipe down moist surfaces, including windowsills in the morning, getting rid of condensationInvest in a dehumidifierIf you’ve got a cold, damp room within your home, that’s going to be an ideal candidate location for your dehumidifier. Moisture spreads from room to room, so making sure your biggest problem area is covered with a dependable dehumidifier will help dealing with condensation and mould problems in your home.  Another effective approach can be investing in better extractor fans throughout your home. Typically, most homes will have an extractor above the oven and another in the shower or bathroom. This can be good enough, but if you’ve got a real moisture problem, it can be worthwhile making sure your extractor fans are up to snuff, and if not, look at upgrading to better models. Another option would be installing extractor fans in problem rooms in the home, notably the bathroom, kitchen or utility room. Dealing with Existing Condensation and Mould Problems in Your HomeMaking sure to keep on top of moisture, monitoring with a humidity meter, turning on extractor fans, wiping up condensation, regularly airing out and cleaning up any mould is going to go a long way toward dealing with any issues.Cleaning up surface mould can be as simple as using a strong surface cleaner, or a steam cleaner, and making sure the space dries out completely. If want to avoid using any strong chemicals, white vinegar can also be effective for dealing with surface mould spots. As far as the spores are concerned, air purifiers can be helpful, and interestingly, NASA published a list of houseplants that can help process spores out of the air, including spider plants. However, it’s worth noting that houseplants can increase moisture as well. 

How To Pick An Extractor Fan For Your Bathroom

If you're like most people, you probably don't give much thought to the extractor fan in your bathroom. But if you're considering renovating your bathroom, or just want to make sure your extractor fan is in good working order, it's worth taking a closer look at these handy little appliances. In this blog post, we'll take a look at what factors you should consider when choosing an extractor fan for your bathroom and share the types of extractor fans on the market today. So whether you're looking for a new extractor fan or just want to better understand what's available, read on for more information!What Is An Extractor Fan And What Does It Do?An extractor fan is a device that helps to remove stale air from a room and circulate fresh air. They are commonly used in bathrooms and kitchens, as these are the rooms where bad smells are most likely to build up. Extractor fans work by drawing air out of the room and into a duct system, through which it is then expelled outdoors. This process helps to prevent odours from lingering in the room, and it also helps to keep the air in the room fresh and free from pollutants. In addition to helping to improve indoor air quality, extractor fans can also help to reduce moisture levels in a room, which can prevent mould and mildew from developing. As a result, extractor fans are an essential component of any home that wants to maintain a healthy indoor environment.Types Of Extractor FansThere are three main types of extractor fans available on the market, each with its own unique set of benefits and for specific locations and uses. The best extractor fan for you will largely depend on the area you install it in, and the volume of moisture that will need to be extracted. Inline Extractor FansInline extractor fans are those which sit within the run of ducting, often in the loft space or ceiling void. Because they are less visible, many people believe that they are a better option for installations where long duct runs are necessary or for areas where large amounts of airflow are required, such as in kitchens or large bathrooms. Inline extractor fans can provide a much greater extraction rate, making them ideal for locations where serious condensation or mould problems might be an issue. Ultimately, this type of fan can be a great choice for anyone who needs to remove large amounts of moisture from their bathroom quickly and efficiently.Axial Extractor FansAxial extractor fans are designed for installation directly through an external wall, or in the ceiling on a very short duct run. Most people will picture an axial fan when they think of a bathroom extractor fan. However, axial extractor fans tend to be less powerful than inline and centrifugal extractor fans. Due to this, they shouldn't be used for situations where ducting will run over 2 metres. But, they should be more than up to the job for a standard-sized family bathroom. So, if you're looking for a dependable and easy-to-install extractor fan, an axial model might be the right choice for you.Centrifugal Extractor FansWhen it comes to bathroom extractor fans, centrifugal fans are far more powerful than your average axial fan. Centrifugal fans work by drawing air into the fan intake and then extracting it at a 90-degree angle. This allows for greater pressure to be generated, making it ideal for long duct runs. If you have a bathroom with no external walls, a centrifugal fan is your best bet for ensuring proper airflow. In addition, centrifugal fans often include more switching and operating options than other types of fans. So if you're looking for a fan that can withstand heavy use and get the job done right, a centrifugal fan is your best bet. How To Pick The Right Extractor FanWhat's the point of having an extractor fan in your bathroom if it's not going to do its job properly? Whether you're looking to replace an old extractor fan or install one for the first time, it's important to choose the right model for your needs. However, if you’re short on time and are looking for the top extractor fans collection, take a look at this top-notch collection of Airflow extractor fans that are sure to be the best fit for your bathroom! This guide will help you figure out which extractor fan is right for you and what to look for. So, whether your bathroom is plagued by unpleasant odours or just needs some extra ventilation, read on!Operating StyleWhen considering which bathroom extractor fan to buy, it's important to think about how you want it to operate. Do you want to turn it on manually, or have it set to turn on automatically when someone enters the room? Some fans have timers, so they'll turn off a set time after the lights. Finally, some extractor fans have a Passive Infrared Sensor (PIR) that detects moisture in the air and will turn the fan on and off accordingly. So, operating style is definitely something to consider when making your purchase.Air Exchange RateThe air extraction rate is an important factor to consider when looking for the best bathroom extractor fan. This rate is measured in 'Litres per Second' (l/s) or 'Metres Cubed per Hour' (m³/hr) and refers to the amount of air that the fan can remove when operational. Building regulations state that a fan must be able to extract a minimum of 15L/s in a standard domestic bathroom, so most models will have this covered. However, for larger or well-used bathrooms, a higher extraction rate might be necessary.Fixed Vs Gravity GrillesFixed grilles are attached to the wall or ceiling and do not move. This makes them quieter than gravity grilles, which have slats that open and close during the extraction process. However, because they are not constantly moving, air can sometimes seep through the slots in a fixed grille. Gravity grilles, on the other hand, are designed to prevent backdrafts when not in use. But because they are constantly moving, they can be noisier than fixed grilles—especially if they are located beneath a bedroom window. So which is the best type of bathroom extractor fan for you? It depends on your needs and preferences. If you want a quiet fan, go for a fixed grille. But if you're more concerned about preventing backdrafts, then a gravity grille might be a better choice.Decibel LevelYou might not realise it, but some extractor fans can be pretty noisy. This can definitely be an issue, especially if the noise is loud enough to disturb your neighbours. Or, if you have children and tend to shower after their bedtimes. Additionally, if you are susceptible to noise yourself, then you know how big of an inconvenience this can be. But did you know that there are many low-noise models available? In fact, most manufacturers provide a decibel level so that you have an idea of how noisy the unit is. The Best Place To Put An Extractor FanThe ideal place for your bathroom extractor fan depends on your specific type of fan and the bathroom zones it is compatible with. Read on to get an idea about the different bathroom zones in the UK and which type of bathroom fan to place there. Zone 0Zone 0 is the area inside a bath, basin, or shower. Any electrical fittings or appliances used in this zone must be low voltage (12 volts or less) and fully protected against partial or complete immersion in water. This means they have an IPX7 rating or higher. So, when choosing an extractor fan for your bathroom, be sure to check the ratings of the fans that are safe for Zone 0.Zone 1 And Zone 2Zone 1 and zone 2 are critical areas in a bathroom where water-resistant fittings are essential to avoid any possible damage. Any fittings used in zone 1 and zone 2 of a bathroom must be rated IPx4 or higher, which means they can withstand water spray from all directions. This includes the area above the bathtub or shower. There are two types of bathroom fans that can be used in Zones 1 and 2. The first type is a SELV fan, which uses a transformer to reduce the voltage from 240v to 12v. These types of fans are safe to use in these zones. The second type of fan that can be used in these zones is any fan that has an IP45 rating. This means that the motor and all other electrical parts are resistant to jets of water from all angles. Both types of fans are safe to use in these zones and will provide adequate ventilation for your bathroom.Zone 3 And OutsideZone 3 is considered to be a safe distance from the principal sources of water, so any extractor fan, regardless of voltage or IP rating, may be installed here. Inline fans are one option and these are installed in the loft space above the bathroom. They are connected to the bathroom via a length of ducting, and the fan itself is housed remotely, outside of the zonal area. This means that inline fans are also suitable for extracting from any bathroom zone. Best Extractor Fan SizeThe size of an extractor fan is important to consider because it will determine the airflow and efficiency of the unit. Most extractor fans come in a standard 4-inch size, which is appropriate for smaller rooms. However, some models offer a 6-inch variant for larger rooms or kitchens. Axial fans may also come in 5-inch versions, while inline fans can be found in sizes up to 8 inches. When it comes to extractor fans, size definitely matters. The main difference between all the different sizes is the extraction rate - the larger the fan blade, the more powerful the fan. If you have a large room, you'll need a bigger fan to get the job done right. So when you're choosing an extractor fan for your home, make sure you pick one that's the right size for the job.ConclusionExtractor fans are a must-have for any bathroom. Not only do they keep your bathroom smelling fresh, but they also help to keep the moisture levels down. In this blog post, we’ve outlined the different types of extractor fans and how to pick the right one for your needs. We’ve also provided some tips on where to put it and what size you need. If you have any questions or want more information, don’t hesitate to contact us. We have a wide selection of extractor fans available and would be happy to help you find the perfect one for your home.

Health Problems caused by Condensation and Top Tips to Avoid its Build-up

When moisture makes contact with a cooler surface, such as a window or wall, the warm air around it is unable to hold the same amount of moisture. This means the water is released onto the colder surface, creating droplets of water - referred to as ‘condensation’. Condensation may also form in areas where airflow is limited, such as behind bedroom furniture or inside wardrobes. Any area that is not open to light and the occasional bit of airing is susceptible to condensation. The main problem associated with condensation is mould, which may start to form on clothes, furniture and walls if the problem is left unchecked. Ventilation specialists such as Envirovent have been working for decades to provide products that prevent these conditions. Condensation - spotting the problem early on With the rise of so-called ‘energy conscious’ housing, many of us have implemented energy-efficient ways to stop heat escaping our homes. These measures include insulation, draft-proofing, double-glazing and the blocking of chimneys - all of which increase the humidity of our indoor air, which leads to condensation. If your home is suffering from condensation you will start to see signs very quickly. Look out for the following: Steaming windows. Wet walls. Damp areas on walls. Wallpaper may be peeling. There may be signs of mould growth (most commonly in unaired spaces). There may be a musty smell on your clothes. Black dots appearing on your window frames. Soft furnishings and fabrics become more prone to mould and mildew. Don’t become complacent when it comes to condensation. Steaming windows are the most obvious sign that you have an underlying problem that needs to be resolved. If you do not react fast enough, you will leave yourself vulnerable to a recurring issue that may have debilitating effects on the residents of your household. Wet windows are the first sign, and will inevitably lead to problems such as damp patches on walls, peeling wallpaper and - worst of all black mould growth. However, it is one of the most common problems that home-owners will have to face, and one which can be tackled if you follow our advice. If you wish to carry out a completely free home survey, provided by Envirovent (a company which was established to provide healthy ventilation through eco-efficient means), then click here to arrange one at your convenience. Damage and health problems posed by condensation Condensation remains arguably the largest cause of dampness in indoor areas, and can eventually lead to the growth of mould. If left unaddressed, condensation can damage property by fraying curtains, peeling wallpaper and creating a generally musty environment. The health problems associated with mould have to be emphasised also, for mould can lead to a litany of ailments. Prolonged exposure to copious levels of indoor dampness can reduce lung function and cause chronic health problems such as asthma. When exposed to mould, those who already suffer from asthma and allergies are more likely to have more severe symptoms.It can lead to other serious medical conditions, such as bronchitis and pneumonia. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), a considerable proportion of the world’s 300 million cases of childhood asthma are attributable to exposure to indoor dampness and mould. It is a problem for the entire family, or any group of residents that live in a mould-infested building. Our tips for avoiding the build-up of condensation With careful planning, you will be able to prevent condensation forming in your home - before it becomes a problem. Condensation prevention techniques help ensure that your property remains both damp and mould free. This will save you having to spend more money in the future by continuously removing condensation. Here are our tips: Try to keep your interior temperature reasonably constant. Avoid drying clothes indoors. Do not dry your clothes over any type of radiator. Ensure tumble driers are properly vented or that the condensation build-up is regularly emptied. Keep your furniture a good distance away from your walls. Do not switch off or disable extractor fans for an extended period of time. Ensure your extractor fans are well maintained and offer sufficient airflow. Many of us fall victim to spotting condensation and not thinking it is not a serious problem. We may only open a window to air out the room in response, but sometimes this is simply not enough. Opening a window may exacerbate the problem, as the weather outdoors has more moisture and higher humidity than the inside of your home. If humidity levels reach 50% or above, then this could trigger the worsening of existing allergies and asthma conditions. A great tip for preventing condensation and dangerous humidity levels is to get yourself a dehumidifier. They prevent condensation by providing a continuous source of fresh air into your home. A prime level of ventilation is essential for locations such as the kitchen, or wherever you wash and dry your clothes. Good ventilation is also required in your bathroom to eliminate moisture that is produced by taking a shower or bath. However, there are a few downsides to dehumidifiers. They must be emptied on a regular basis and are only effective in the room where they are placed. They can consume anywhere between 50 to 800 watts in a single day. However, these slight setbacks are worth it, if it means staving off the ultimate enemy - harmful and mouldy living conditions. Envirovent provides environmentally friendly protection from condensation Envirovent has a ventilation system for every kind of house you could imagine. Their system is engineered to be adaptable, so will fit into apartments, bungalows, houses or even large building projects. Envirovent boasts a wide range of ventilation systems and products, many of which you can purchase here, at Sparks. You can rest assured that their tried and tested systems will definitely improve your indoor air quality and have a positive impact on your health and home. They have identified kitchens, bathrooms, ensuites, WCs and utility rooms as the main break-out points for condensation, and devised a whole home solution. Enviroment’s HeatSava range of ventilation devices can deliver fresh, filtered air into your home, gently ventilating the property using a technique called Positive Input Ventilation (PIV). This method dilutes high levels of humidity which cause condensation and harmful household contaminants. This creates a healthy living environment, free from condensation and the associated risks. The great news is that hundreds of thousands of households across the UK have already have a condensation control unit or other ventilation product installed. If you haven’t yet, we here at Sparks fully recommend you look into Envirovent’s range of ventilation solutions. They are modern, eco-friendly and will keep you safe from dangers posed by condensation.

Bathroom Extractor Fan Comparison: the Silent Design 100 vs the Silhouette S100

Today we are putting two bathroom fans against one another. We have a lot of ventilation fans in-store, but they're not all intended for the same purpose - some fans are more equal than others. Note: the Silhouette S100 range is no longer available on our website; see the full Envirovent range we currently distribute. A bathroom fan needs to have a great extraction rate to fight condensation, odours, and the formation of allergens (particularly mould). It ought to be quiet enough to run in the middle of the night without waking everyone up, and with the drive to save energy, it should consume as little energy as possible. The Silhouette S100 and the Silent Design 100 are similarly priced - but which of them offers more value for money? Bathrom Extractor Fans Comparison Silhouette S100 Silent Design 100 Ducting size 100mm 100mm Power Consumption 16W 8W Airflow 26 litres/sec 22 litres/sec Noise 37 dB(A) 26.5 dB(A) IP Rating IPx4 IP45 Operation Manual switch Manual switch and timer Integral Timer No Yes The Results The S100 fan is more suited to bathrooms and utility rooms whereas the Silent Design 100 is drip-proof, consumes less power with an 8W motor and integral timer operation, and is - well, almost silent. For intermittent ventilation in a domestic bathroom, this is the clear option. However, the S100 has a slightly higher extraction rate - and if you remember this video, you might recall that the Silent Design 100's flat cover is a natural enemy of the extractor fan - or at least it would be, if not for the curved design of the cover that counteracts the effect. As listed, both these items exceed the extract ventilation rates mandated by the Building Regulations ADF (2010).It should be noted that the Silhouette S100 can be expanded at a little extra cost to include more features than the Silent Design 100, but it runs a higher cost. A timer model, for example, runs to approx. £37 + VAT, but more options are available including motion sensing and humidity-regulating models.In comparison, a humidity-sensing model of the Silent Design 100 costs £57 + VAT. If you need more granular control options, for example in office buildings and commercial properties, this is the model of choice.Note: all the Envirovent extractor fans can be found on our website; see this link for the latest offering.